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Check back often for the most recent articles, guest blog posts, and other writing. Downloadable materials are available from the sidebar on the left.

How to Use Class Time During the Last Two Weeks of School (Edweek: Larry Ferlazzo’s Classroom Q&A)

For teachers, summer’s gentle breeze can feel more like a strong headwind. After all, test-pressure season and other stressful parts of the year are over. Now you’ve got materials to pack, grades to finish, and the occasional bird flying into your classroom window and knocking itself unconscious. You’re also starting to suspect that your school’s breakfast program has started serving energy drinks and candy. The temptation to go on autopilot is strong during the final stretch of the school year, but that doesn’t mean veering off course. Here are a few of my tips for preparing for a smooth landing (and those of fellow teacher-author Donalyn Miller) on Larry Ferlazzo’s Classroom Q&A.

Class Dismissed! Find Professional Development in Unexpected Places (Educational Horizons)

If you’re paying attention, the elements of good instruction can be found in many contexts. Here are a few professionally developing experiences that are already a part of your life and don’t involve a single PowerPoint slide.

Class Dismissed! Six Student Study Habits Teachers Need, Too (Educational Horizons)

That’s right: We’re not good at group work either.

This Class Dismissed! column calls out those moments when teachers should take notes from our own lectures about staying on task.

Class Dismissed! An Unscientific Guide to Interpreting Teacher Nightmares (Educational Horizons)

My interpretations of common teacher dreams, including that one where you show up to school late in your bathrobe.

Totally non-research-based, non-data-driven, unscientific. You’ll love it.

Several Ways to Get the New Year Off to a Good Start (Ed Week: Larry Ferlazzo’s Classroom Q&A)

As you may already know, I am a big fan of Larry Ferlazzo’s blogs, so I was happy to be invited to share Several Ways to Get the New Year Off to a Good Start with co-contributor and fellow author Rick Wormeli.

My three tips: Plan for interruptions. Plan for paper. Plan for sleep.

The Best Advice for New Teachers (Larry Ferlazzo)

Larry Ferlazzo is an award-winning ESL teacher, advice columnist and famous maker of a long list of over helpful lists for teachers. I’m excited to announce that several of my columns are featured in his Best Advice for New Teachers list.

Excel Column Award for “Class Dismissed!”

Association Media & Publishing chose a Class Dismissed! column, Is There Life After Lesson Planning? for a 2012 Excel Award.

Yay! Here’s a complete list of  award winners.

Your Principals Vs. Your Principal: How to Speak Up and When to Shut Up (Educational Horizons)

In college, students are encouraged to share their opinions, keep debates lively, and play the devil’s advocate.  You have probably noticed this is not the case at your school’s faculty meetings.

In fact, one of the most common mistakes new teachers make is showing up on the administrative radar too early, too often, and for the wrong reasons – but a tough conversation doesn’t have to mean making enemies in the main office. Read this season’s Class Dismissed column in Educational Horizons magazine for more information.

Before You Hit on me Again, Let’s Talk (Phi Delta Kappan)

Phi Delta Kappan is a professional journal that focuses on service, research, and leadership. They published an adapted version of my (kind of) love letter from teachers to education technology in their March, 2012 issue. Here is a link to the abstract on the Kappan website. Kappan subscribers can read the whole article. Non-subscribers can see the original version  here on Rick Hess Straight Up.

Class Dismissed: Parent Communication for the Twenty-Two-And-A-Half-Year-Old Teacher. (Educational Horizons)

Ten years from now, you’ll love it when people assume you are young. Early in your teaching career, however, comments about your age can feel like thinly-veiled doubts as to whether you know what you’re doing. The last thing you want is for students’ parents to describe you as adorable or call you “sweetie” during a conference.

Read parent-communication advice specifically for cute inexperienced adorable non-authoritative younger teachers in my spring Class Dismissed column for PDK’s Educational Horizons Magazine.